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Finding and Keeping Talent

Without question, talent—or the lack thereof— was a leading theme at every session of every conference I attended this past year.

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This is an excerpt of the original article. It was written for the July-August 2017 edition of Supply Chain Management Review. The full article is available to current subscribers.

July-August 2017

A few years ago, a Harvard Business Review cover posed the question: What’s the secret to winning in the global economy? The answer: Talent.
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A few years ago, a Harvard Business Review cover posed the question: What’s the secret to winning in the global economy? The answer: Talent.

Without question, talent—or the lack thereof— was a leading theme at every session of every conference I attended this past year. I remember sitting through a compelling presentation on the Internet of Things and Big Data at APICS last fall. At the end, one of the attendees remarked that this was all well and good, but when it came to the skill set required to make IoT and Big Data a reality, her organization was like an empty stage. “I don’t know where I’d find them,” she added. If we’d been in church instead of a supply chain conference, you would’ve heard some “amens.” Given the changes taking place at the speed of business, finding talent is perhaps the most important challenge facing supply chain managers.

Talent is the theme for the July/August issue of Supply Chain Management Review. We lead off with the second in a series on the strategic supply chain co-authored by Michigan State’s Steven A. Melnyk. In this piece, Melnyk and Daniel J. Stanton write that the future of our profession is the customer-centric supply chain. That is one where cost-cutting is no longer job No. 1. Rather, running a supply chain aligned with your customers’ metrics is the goal. Making that shift will require a new kind of manager. In a similar vein, Accenture partner Michael A. Meyer explains why a continual focus on improving the current workforce and attracting new talent must be the new mandate for supply chain executives.

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Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

From the July-August 2017 edition of Supply Chain Management Review.

July-August 2017

A few years ago, a Harvard Business Review cover posed the question: What’s the secret to winning in the global economy? The answer: Talent.
Browse this issue archive.
Access your online digital edition.
Download a PDF file of the July-August 2017 issue.

Download Article PDF

A few years ago, a Harvard Business Review cover posed the question: What's the secret to winning in the global economy? The answer: Talent.

Without question, talent—or the lack thereof— was a leading theme at every session of every conference I attended this past year. I remember sitting through a compelling presentation on the Internet of Things and Big Data at APICS last fall. At the end, one of the attendees remarked that this was all well and good, but when it came to the skill set required to make IoT and Big Data a reality, her organization was like an empty stage. “I don't know where I'd find them,” she added. If we'd been in church instead of a supply chain conference, you would've heard some “amens.” Given the changes taking place at the speed of business, finding talent is perhaps the most important challenge facing supply chain managers.

Talent is the theme for the July/August issue of Supply Chain Management Review. We lead off with the second in a series on the strategic supply chain co-authored by Michigan State's Steven A. Melnyk. In this piece, Melnyk and Daniel J. Stanton write that the future of our profession is the customer-centric supply chain. That is one where cost-cutting is no longer job No. 1. Rather, running a supply chain aligned with your customers' metrics is the goal. Making that shift will require a new kind of manager. In a similar vein, Accenture partner Michael A. Meyer explains why a continual focus on improving the current workforce and attracting new talent must be the new mandate for supply chain executives.

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About the Author

Bob Trebilcock, MMH Executive Editor and SCMR contributor
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Bob Trebilcock is the editorial director for Modern Materials Handling and an editorial advisor to Supply Chain Management Review. He has covered materials handling, technology, logistics, and supply chain topics for nearly 40 years. He is a graduate of Bowling Green State University. He lives in Chicago and can be reached at 603-852-8976.

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