•   Exclusive

Measuring the impact of sourcing on the world’s workforce

Nearly a full score of GISC member companies have pledged to hire more than 25,000 new impact workers by the end of next year. The goal for 2021 is 100,000.

Subscriber: Log Out

Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

This is an excerpt of the original article. It was written for the November 2019 edition of Supply Chain Management Review. The full article is available to current subscribers.

November 2019

We hear a lot about emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. We hear less about one of the enabling technologies that makes the others possible:
Browse this issue archive.
Already a subscriber? Access full edition now.

Need Help?
Contact customer service
847-559-7581   More options
Not a subscriber? Start your magazine subscription.

While it is almost a given that a company’s procurement decisions can contribute to poverty alleviation and inclusive growth around the world, a new group is actually doing something about it.

The Global Impact sourcing Challenge is the first business network to specifically focus on escalating impact sourcing as a way to increase employment and career development opportunities for disadvantaged workers. It is seen as the largest official commitment to “Sustainable Development Goals” outlined by the United Nations, as its main focus is on inclusive job creation.

“It is a great example of collaboration,” says Tim Hopper, responsible sourcing manager at Microsoft. “Through intentionally choosing impact sourcing, and increasing the number of impact worker jobs, companies are able to create social benefits on top of generating business value.”

Containing job erosion

According to the UN, roughly half of the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about $2 a day, with global unemployment rates of 5.7%; having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty in many places. This slow and uneven progress requires multinationals to rethink and retool their economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

This complete article is available to subscribers only. Log in now for full access or start your PLUS+ subscription for instant access.

SC
MR

Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

From the November 2019 edition of Supply Chain Management Review.

November 2019

We hear a lot about emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. We hear less about one of the enabling technologies that makes the others possible:
Browse this issue archive.
Access your online digital edition.
Download a PDF file of the November 2019 issue.

While it is almost a given that a company's procurement decisions can contribute to poverty alleviation and inclusive growth around the world, a new group is actually doing something about it.

The Global Impact sourcing Challenge is the first business network to specifically focus on escalating impact sourcing as a way to increase employment and career development opportunities for disadvantaged workers. It is seen as the largest official commitment to “Sustainable Development Goals” outlined by the United Nations, as its main focus is on inclusive job creation.

“It is a great example of collaboration,” says Tim Hopper, responsible sourcing manager at Microsoft. “Through intentionally choosing impact sourcing, and increasing the number of impact worker jobs, companies are able to create social benefits on top of generating business value.”

Containing job erosion

According to the UN, roughly half of the world's population still lives on the equivalent of about $2 a day, with global unemployment rates of 5.7%; having a job doesn't guarantee the ability to escape from poverty in many places. This slow and uneven progress requires multinationals to rethink and retool their economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

SC
MR

Latest Podcast
Talking Supply Chain: The last-mile tech advantage
Last-mile delivery success depends on many aspects of the supply chain to work effectively together, but none is more important than the…
Listen in

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson

Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor specializing in international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He is based in San Francisco, where he provides a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. He may be reached at his downtown office: [email protected].

View Patrick 's author profile.

Subscribe

Supply Chain Management Review delivers the best industry content.
Subscribe today and get full access to all of Supply Chain Management Review’s exclusive content, email newsletters, premium resources and in-depth, comprehensive feature articles written by the industry's top experts on the subjects that matter most to supply chain professionals.
×

Search

Search

Sourcing & Procurement

Inventory Management Risk Management Global Trade Ports & Shipping

Business Management

Supply Chain TMS WMS 3PL Government & Regulation Sustainability Finance

Software & Technology

Artificial Intelligence Automation Cloud IoT Robotics Software

The Academy

Executive Education Associations Institutions Universities & Colleges

Resources

Podcasts Webcasts Companies Visionaries White Papers Special Reports Premiums Magazine Archive

Subscribe

SCMR Magazine Newsletters Magazine Archives Customer Service

Press Releases

Press Releases Submit Press Release