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Greener supply chains = greater profit

A new survey from HSBC finds that businesses are turning to sustainable supply chains to improve their bottom lines.

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This is an excerpt of the original article. It was written for the March-April 2019 edition of Supply Chain Management Review. The full article is available to current subscribers.

March-April 2019

A few days ago, a colleague sent me “The Death of Supply Chain Management,” an article in the Harvard Business Review. If the title wasn’t enough to grab my attention, the last sentence in the first paragraph had me checking out job openings on LinkedIn: “Within five years to 10 years, the supply chain function may be obsolete, replaced by a smoothly running, selfregulating utility that ….. requires very little human attention.” Read more carefully, what the authors are really arguing is that as NextGen technologies find their place in our organizations, the role of the supply chain manager, including procurement managers, is going to…
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Navigator: Now, next and how for business,” a new survey of more than 8,500 companies in 34 markets from HSBC Navigator, confirms what Global Links readers have suspected all along. The inexorable march toward cleaner supply chains addresses climate change while delivering shareholder value and monetizing new lean disciplines.

According to the survey, almost one third (31%) of companies globally plan to make sustainability-related changes to their supply chains over the next three years. Of those making ethical or environmentally sustainable changes to their supply chains, cost efficiencies (84%) and improved revenues and financial performance (also 84%) are the primary motivations.

This trend comes as companies face increasing pressure from customers to be more sustainable and transparent about their sourcing. With around 80% of a company’s environmental impact found in its supply chain, the “green” credentials of strategic suppliers and partners are critical factors in a firm’s reputation and performance.

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Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

From the March-April 2019 edition of Supply Chain Management Review.

March-April 2019

A few days ago, a colleague sent me “The Death of Supply Chain Management,” an article in the Harvard Business Review. If the title wasn’t enough to grab my attention, the last sentence in the first paragraph…
Browse this issue archive.
Access your online digital edition.
Download a PDF file of the March-April 2019 issue.

Navigator: Now, next and how for business,” a new survey of more than 8,500 companies in 34 markets from HSBC Navigator, confirms what Global Links readers have suspected all along. The inexorable march toward cleaner supply chains addresses climate change while delivering shareholder value and monetizing new lean disciplines.

According to the survey, almost one third (31%) of companies globally plan to make sustainability-related changes to their supply chains over the next three years. Of those making ethical or environmentally sustainable changes to their supply chains, cost efficiencies (84%) and improved revenues and financial performance (also 84%) are the primary motivations.

This trend comes as companies face increasing pressure from customers to be more sustainable and transparent about their sourcing. With around 80% of a company's environmental impact found in its supply chain, the “green” credentials of strategic suppliers and partners are critical factors in a firm's reputation and performance.

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MR

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson

Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor specializing in international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He is based in San Francisco, where he provides a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. He may be reached at his downtown office: [email protected].

View Patrick 's author profile.

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