•   Exclusive

Developing a flight plan for drone-based parcel delivery

Although the regulatory framework is central to the industry’s future, it remains unclear. But, where there are problems there are also opportunities, especially in an industry that is developing innovative technologies and new operational and business models.

Subscriber: Log Out

Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

This is an excerpt of the original article. It was written for the November 2022 edition of Supply Chain Management Review. The full article is available to current subscribers.

November 2022

Are you resilient? It’s not an idle question. If there’s one word that I’ve heard at every supply chain event I’ve attended this year, its resilience. It is, of course, in response to the last few years in supply chain management. I think its fair to say that supply chains have been knocked to the canvas more times than Rocky. What has become clear as we do our post-pandemic reviews is that the firms that demonstrated the ability to get up off the canvas and keep punching were those that invested in resiliency before the pandemic—even if they didn’t use that term.
Browse this issue archive.
Already a subscriber? Access full edition now.

Need Help?
Contact customer service
847-559-7581   More options
Not a subscriber? Start your magazine subscription.

The global cost of parcel delivery, excluding pickup, line-haul and sorting costs, is approximately $80 billion per year, and is growing annually at a rate of 7% to 10% in developed countries and almost 300% in developing countries such as India. The last mile is critically important because it represents a disproportionately large share of parcel delivery costs to the consumer. Hence, it is not surprising that there is much activity around finding innovative last-mile solutions that minimize costs and maximize service levels, especially in dense urban centers.

Aggregated solutions like parcel lockers and public drop-off points are being deployed, and multi-echelon options are gaining in popularity as large trucks become increasingly ill-suited to urban routes. But the technology that has perhaps received the most public attention is unmanned
aerial vehicles, commonly called drones.

The type of unmanned aerial vehicles for last-mile delivery (UAV-LMDs) envisoned by most last-mile logistics players is unique in three ways: low per-vehicle capital costs, autonomous operation and the ability to travel rapidly point-to-point. Yet the vision of fleets of drones traversing city airways to deliver parcels remains far from reality.

This complete article is available to subscribers only. Log in now for full access or start your PLUS+ subscription for instant access.

SC
MR

Sorry, but your login has failed. Please recheck your login information and resubmit. If your subscription has expired, renew here.

From the November 2022 edition of Supply Chain Management Review.

November 2022

Are you resilient? It’s not an idle question. If there’s one word that I’ve heard at every supply chain event I’ve attended this year, its resilience. It is, of course, in response to the last few years in…
Browse this issue archive.
Access your online digital edition.
Download a PDF file of the November 2022 issue.

Download Article PDF

The global cost of parcel delivery, excluding pickup, line-haul and sorting costs, is approximately $80 billion per year, and is growing annually at a rate of 7% to 10% in developed countries and almost 300% in developing countries such as India. The last mile is critically important because it represents a disproportionately large share of parcel delivery costs to the consumer. Hence, it is not surprising that there is much activity around finding innovative last-mile solutions that minimize costs and maximize service levels, especially in dense urban centers.

Aggregated solutions like parcel lockers and public drop-off points are being deployed, and multi-echelon options are gaining in popularity as large trucks become increasingly ill-suited to urban routes. But the technology that has perhaps received the most public attention is unmanned
aerial vehicles, commonly called drones.

The type of unmanned aerial vehicles for last-mile delivery (UAV-LMDs) envisoned by most last-mile logistics players is unique in three ways: low per-vehicle capital costs, autonomous operation and the ability to travel rapidly point-to-point. Yet the vision of fleets of drones traversing city airways to deliver parcels remains far from reality.

SUBSCRIBERS: Click here to download PDF of the full article.

SC
MR

Latest Podcast
Talking Supply Chain: Doomsday never arrives for Baltimore bridge collapse impacts
The collapse of Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key bridge brought doomsday headlines for the supply chain. But the reality has been something less…
Listen in

About the Author

SCMR Staff
SCMR Staff

Follow SCMR for the latest supply chain news, podcasts and resources.

View SCMR's author profile.

Subscribe

Supply Chain Management Review delivers the best industry content.
Subscribe today and get full access to all of Supply Chain Management Review’s exclusive content, email newsletters, premium resources and in-depth, comprehensive feature articles written by the industry's top experts on the subjects that matter most to supply chain professionals.
×

Search

Search

Sourcing & Procurement

Inventory Management Risk Management Global Trade Ports & Shipping

Business Management

Supply Chain TMS WMS 3PL Government & Regulation Sustainability Finance

Software & Technology

Artificial Intelligence Automation Cloud IoT Robotics Software

The Academy

Executive Education Associations Institutions Universities & Colleges

Resources

Podcasts Webcasts Companies Visionaries White Papers Special Reports Premiums Magazine Archive

Subscribe

SCMR Magazine Newsletters Magazine Archives Customer Service