Cut costs and emissions with lithium-ion forklifts

Read the case study to unpack how the change to this electric power option can help operations limit costs, reduce emissions, improve work environments and boost labor utilization.

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Two companies decided to switch their forklift fleet from trucks powered by internal combustion engines (ICE) and lead acid batteries to ones powered by lithium-ion batteries. The results?

  • Cost savings - one even saved $1.5 million
  • Productivity gains
  • Zero emissions or charging fumes
  • Read the case study to unpack how the change to this electric power option can help operations limit costs, reduce emissions, improve work environments and boost labor utilization.

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