PLUS+ Login


To log into your PLUS+ Account, complete and submit the information below.

Not a PLUS+ subscriber already? Become one now.


For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Premium access to exclusive online content,
companion digital editions, magazine issues and
email newsletters. Subscribe Now.



Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2009.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $109/year*. Begin yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

* Prices higher for subscriptions outside the USA.

PLUS+ Customer Service Support


Customer service for all PLUS+ subscribers is available Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm Eastern time.

Email: scmrsubs@ehpub.com
Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)
Mail: PO Box 1496, Framingham MA 01701-1496, USA



You have been logged out of PLUS+

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service

Need to access our premium PLUS+ Content?
Upgrade your subscription now.

Our records show that you are currently receiving a free subscription to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, or your subscription has expired. To access our premium content, you need to upgrade your subscription to our PLUS+ status.

To upgrade your subscription account, please contact customer service at:

Email: scmrsubs@ehpub.com Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)

Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2010.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $129/year*. Start yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

This content is available for PLUS+ subscribers.


Already a PLUS+ subscriber?
To begin or upgrade your subscription, Become a PLUS+ subscriber now.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Sorry, but your login to PLUS+ has failed.


Please recheck your login information and resubmit below.



For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

The container That Grew Legs: Five Ways to Safeguard Your Cargo

There are several ways shippers, carriers, and logistics providers can collaborate to avoid potentially costly thefts.

May 26, 2016 - SCMR Editorial

Editor’s Note: Michael Meeks is the Director of Risk Management for AFN. He has more than 13 years of experience in the risk management and insurance industries, including 11 years in multi-line commercial and transportation claims. At AFN, Michael oversees the Risk/Legal Department, including its claims, compliance and security division.

A group of thieves in Los Angeles blitzed a local storage facility, making off with a pair of trailers holding $3 million worth of computers. Local authorities in Miami busted a thief who created a fraudulent driver profile – including fake driver’s license, fake company ID card and facility exit pass – to haul off cargo from a Miami International Airport warehouse.

Both incidents occurred in just the past month.

As cargo thieves become more organized (and audacious), it’s crucial that shippers, carriers and logistics providers layer technology and safety protocols across the shipping process – from load planning through pick-up and delivery – to safeguard against theft.

Shipments most at-risk

Keeping cargo theft in check continues to pose challenges for shippers and carriers alike, especially as thieves become savvier and target more vulnerable loads. And according to several recent reports, the type of cargo thieves target may be changing.

Cargo theft prevention and recovery network, CargoNet recently released its latest theft trend analysis. Of the 881 incidents CargoNet tracked in 2015, the most common targets were relatively low value food and beverage items (about 28 percent of all stolen cargo). Likewise, FreightWatch International noted in its latest report that, while cargo theft incidents increased by about 13 percent in Q1 as compared to the previous quarter (Q4 2015), the average value of the stolen goods dipped. The report posited that thieves may be curbing their risk by going after lower value loads. 

High value loads like electronics and pharmaceuticals continue to draw attention, but as potential thieves consider lower value goods, security concerns multiply for shippers and carriers. There are simply more lower-value shipments, and therefore many more loads potentially at risk.

There are several ways shippers, carriers, and logistics providers can collaborate to avoid potentially costly thefts. Ideally, this includes a blend of process, protocols, and technology, developed to suit the unique challenges of the freight in question.

Driver hand-off

Thieves don’t simply target cargo on the road. Often, they attempt to infiltrate warehouses, posing as drivers with seemingly valid credentials (sometimes just a commercial driver’s license and ID card) to gain access to cargo and escort it out of the facility without anyone batting an eye. Both shippers and carriers play a part in weeding out these thieves.

For shippers, requiring drivers to present valid documentation at the time of pick-up should be the bare minimum layer of defense. It’s the first barrier to would-be thieves. Carriers bear responsibility for verifying driver credentials and history through background checks, ensuring drivers who pick up certain loads are qualified and prepared to handle them.

Technology on the vehicle

Trucks and trailers also have minimum standards when it comes to technology. GPS units installed on-board should be standard at this point. In fact, many third party logistics providers require them from any carrier they work with. Without one, both shippers and carriers are essentially flying blind, relying on drivers to get from Point A to Point B with no recourse if something happens in between. Both trucks and trailers should also have locking mechanisms with sensors that alert supervisors if breached. Newer locking mechanisms can also integrate GPS functionality, meaning doors can’t be unlocked until the trailer actually reaches its intended destination. A best practice is the incorporation of multiple vehicle security measures and devices working together.

Technology in the cargo

Sensors embedded in the cargo itself act as eyes on the ground and can signal potential thefts based on various criteria. For instance, if thieves manage to bypass safeguards on the trailer, motion sensors in cargo can help supervisors identify whether an unauthorized unload is taking place. If cargo is on the move but the vehicle is stopped and doors appear to be locked, theft is a good bet. Additionally, motion sensors can be configured to sound alerts when a truck makes an unscheduled stop, or deviates from the planned route. GPS-enabled sensors can also help authorities track down cargo after a heist takes place.

Preparing the safest trip

Cargo is most vulnerable when the vehicle is stopped, which happens in a number of places: When trailers sit in detention at a shipping facility or storage yard, and when drivers pull off the highway or into weight stations. Optimizing shipping routes and itineraries is an easy, preemptive strike against cargo theft. Both shippers and logistics providers should also vet storage yards ahead of time to ensure that when cargo is stopped or in storage, the facility provides appropriate security measures to prevent being targeted. 

An agile recovery plan

When all else fails, carriers should have protocols in place in the event of a theft incident. One of the stolen loads above was recovered in short order thanks to close collaboration with local law enforcement. Both carriers and third-party providers should maintain these relationships across their delivery regions, as well as collaborate with regional organizations and task forces dedicated to combating cargo theft on the country’s roadways.

Cargo security doesn’t fall on one party. Shippers, carriers and logistics providers share a common goal of cutting down theft and ensuring driver and load security on the roads. And improving in one of the above areas isn’t enough. The most effective approach layers multiple safeguards across the entire shipping process, and starts well before the load is picked up, with thorough carrier and driver vetting and careful load planning, and continues until the load reaches its intended destination.



Subscribe to Supply Chain Management Review magazine

Subscribe today. Don't miss out!
Get in-depth coverage from industry experts with proven techniques for
cutting supply chain costs and case studies in supply chain best practices.
Start Your Subscription Today!

Recent Entries

In an exclusive interview, executives expand on global giant's mission and forecast

Oro, Inc., the creator of OroCommerce, a popular ecommerce platform designed for B2B merchants, today announced a global partnership with Bolloré Logistics, one of the world’s largest logistics and transportation providers

Inventory management gets complicated when a company keeps numerous SKUs with unique product characteristics. This is especially true for medical device companies.

Atradius, a consultancy specializing in trade credit insurance, surety and debt collections, maintains that the global economy has continued to gain momentum over the past months, with a 3.1% expansion projected for this year.

China watchers were quite stunned at the Chinese Plenary Council earlier this month, when Xi Jinping’s philosophy was added to the Chinese Constitution, elevating him to the level of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping.

Article Topics

News · Management · Security · Risk · All topics

About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at pburnson@peerlessmedia.com.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.