Login



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Not a PLUS+ Subscriber?

Become a PLUS+ Subscriber today and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access
  • 7 Magazine Issues per Year
  • Companion Digital Editions
  • Digital Edition Archives
  • Bonus Email Newsletters

Subscribe Today!

Premium access to exclusive online content, companion digital editions, magazine issues and email newsletters.

Subscribe Now.


Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2009.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $109/year*. Begin yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

* Prices higher for subscriptions outside the USA.

PLUS+ Customer Service Support


Customer service for all PLUS+ subscribers is available Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm Eastern time.

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)
Mail: PO Box 1496, Framingham MA 01701-1496, USA



You have been logged out of PLUS+


For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Need to access our premium PLUS+ Content?
Upgrade your subscription now.


Our records show that you are currently receiving a free subscription to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, or your subscription has expired. To access our premium content, you need to upgrade your subscription to our PLUS+ status.

To upgrade your subscription account, please contact customer service at:

Email: [email protected] Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)

Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2010.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $129/year*. Start yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

This content is available for PLUS+ subscribers.


Already a PLUS+ subscriber?


To begin or upgrade your subscription, Become a PLUS+ subscriber now.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Sorry, but your login to PLUS+ has failed.


Please recheck your login information and resubmit below.



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

UPS/TNT Deal May Not Be Done

This is the latest development regarding this deal, following multiple extensions of the Offer Period for the deal and a Statement of Objections (SO) late last month by the European Commission.

By ·

Latest News

Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
The State of the DC Voice Market
Vanderlande invests in collaborative robot specialist Smart Robotics
SSI Schaefer expands North American headquarters
Truck tonnage bounces back in October, reports ATA
More News

Latest Resource

Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
You’ve got a handle on many of the potential supply chain "disrupters" that can paralyze your business. But the real risk is embedded in areas you may have overlooked.
All Resources
By ·

Various media reports issued last week indicate that UPS will take steps to make its case to European Union (EU) antitrust regulators, regarding its planned $6.7 billion acquisition of Netherlands-based TNT NV, a provider of mail and courier services and the fourth largest global parcel operator.

A Bloomberg report stated that UPS will meet with the European Commission on November 12, according to a filing by the European Commission, which cited EU Competition Commissioner as saying UPS needs to offer “substantial remedies” to eliminate concerns of the deal which would double its size in Europe.

This is the latest development regarding this deal, following multiple extensions of the Offer Period for the deal and a Statement of Objections (SO) late last month by the European Commission.

As previously reported, the SO addresses the competitive effects of the intended merger on the international express small package market in Europe,” and UPS and TNT said that the competitive effects will be further defined as the process continues.

While specific details of the SO were not released, UPS and TNT said that the SO is a normal step in a second phase merger and is a confidential document that sets out a provisional position of the Commission and does not prejudge the final outcome of the case.

The Bloomberg report also noted that UPS recently received antitrust objections from regulators which listed potential problems with the deal, including how buying TNT would remove one of the few serious competitors in the European delivery services market. And EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia was quoted in the Bloomberg report as saying the “preliminary view is that serious competition concerns would arise in both cases and substantial remedies are needed.”

A Wall Street Journal report pointed out that given the antitrust concerns over this deal, UPS is separately working on several possible remedies as the November 29 deadline to offer concessions gets closer. Among the concessions, according to the report, are UPS’s U.S. group shrinking its existing presence in the international parcel delivery sector of Europe, where there are the most serious objections to the deal.

Stifel Nicolaus analyst David Ross wrote in a recent research note that the EC and UPS/TNT appear to differ on the size of the parcel market, which Stifel believes is the “main basis for objection to this merger.”

What’s more, Ross noted that the UPS/TNT combination should create the most industry concentration in a few European countries, leaving the possibility that the EC may require a divestiture of some assets in those countries to effectively sell the TNT portion to someone besides UPS for the merger to be approved, but he cautioned that is speculation, given that the EC’s interaction with TNT and UPS is confidential.

UPS will work through this deal, said Jerry Hempstead, president of Hempstead Consulting, just as DHL had to struggle in a battle to acquire Airborne Express in 2003.

“UPS and FedEx waged a bitter war in Washington which cost a lot of time, management energy and money, but eventually the deal got done,” he said. “My theory is that DHL is waging a [similar] campaign with the EU to do to UPS what UPS helped do to DHL in the USA. I am sure that DHL has far more friends in the EU than UPS does. After all Deutsche Post is the German Post Office among other things. Why would the EU want to make it easy for an American firm to enter the market where a European firm is dominant and may hurt them?”

Hempstead opined that eventually UPS will buy most of TNT because if they don’t then TNT, who has now lost momentum because it are waiting for the takeover, will die or be sold to FedEx at a big discount to save the jobs. TNT is going to begin to struggle financially as they continue to stay in acquisition limbo.”

With a penalty of $250 million should the deal not go through, Hempstead said UPS is committed to finding a way to make the deal happen.

“Now they may have to have TNT get rid of more turf than they wanted but UPS is going to keep pressing forward,” he said.”

The joint synergies expected to result from this deal, according to UPS and TNT include:
-the complementary strengths of both organizations creating a customer-focused global platform that will be a leader in transportation technology and customer service;
-TNT Express customers benefiting from UPS’s unparalleled access to the North American market as well as access to its logistics solutions, such as global freight forwarding and distribution capabilities; and
-UPS customers will benefit from access to expanded express and road freight capabilities in Europe and broader capabilities in fast-growing regions such as Asia-Pacific and Latin America.


About the Author

Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman

Subscribe to Supply Chain Management Review Magazine!

Subscribe today. Don't Miss Out!
Get in-depth coverage from industry experts with proven techniques for cutting supply chain costs and case studies in supply chain best practices.
Start Your Subscription Today!

Article Topics

Global · Management · Technology · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
You’ve got a handle on many of the potential supply chain "disrupters" that can paralyze your business. But the real risk is embedded in areas you may have overlooked.
Download Today!
From the September-October 2017
Additive manufacturing and 3D printing promise to simplify manufacturing, reduce inventories, and streamline operations. But, to determine when and how to apply additive manufacturing, organizations need a decision model that assesses it’s market strategy, supply chain performance, and complexity.
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!


Latest Webcast
The Perfect Formula for Determining the Right Amount of Inventory
This webcast explains how the science of theoretical minimums, a new approach to inventory optimization, provides a simple and elegant way to reduce cost and increase customer service levels by monetizing time delays across the extended supply chain.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
Supply Chains in Advanced Markets Should Become More Agile, Says Atradius
Higher inflation, falling unemployment, and strengthening Purchasing Manager Indices all suggest...
Trade Trends Report Confirms E-Commerce Urgency
Because trade policies remain fluid, shippers must have the information needed to be flexible and...

Supply Chain Digitization of Ocean Cargo Gateways Examined by chainPORT
The chainPORT initiative is led by the Ports of Los Angeles and Hamburg Port Authority in Germany,...
Procurement Still Falls Behind in Digitized Supply Chains, Says Accenture
“The digital revolution has largely overlooked procurement,” says Accenture.