Login



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Not a PLUS+ Subscriber?

Become a PLUS+ Subscriber today and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access
  • 7 Magazine Issues per Year
  • Companion Digital Editions
  • Digital Edition Archives
  • Bonus Email Newsletters

Subscribe Today!

Premium access to exclusive online content, companion digital editions, magazine issues and email newsletters.

Subscribe Now.


Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2009.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $109/year*. Begin yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

* Prices higher for subscriptions outside the USA.

PLUS+ Customer Service Support


Customer service for all PLUS+ subscribers is available Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm Eastern time.

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)
Mail: PO Box 1496, Framingham MA 01701-1496, USA



You have been logged out of PLUS+


For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Need to access our premium PLUS+ Content?
Upgrade your subscription now.


Our records show that you are currently receiving a free subscription to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, or your subscription has expired. To access our premium content, you need to upgrade your subscription to our PLUS+ status.

To upgrade your subscription account, please contact customer service at:

Email: [email protected] Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)

Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2010.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $129/year*. Start yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

This content is available for PLUS+ subscribers.


Already a PLUS+ subscriber?


To begin or upgrade your subscription, Become a PLUS+ subscriber now.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Sorry, but your login to PLUS+ has failed.


Please recheck your login information and resubmit below.



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

The Collaboration Journey: Are we there yet?

After 20 plus years of talking about collaboration, there is still a long way to go.

By ·

Twenty years ago, Boston Consulting Group’s Harold Sirkin warned that competition is no longer “company vs. company but supply chain vs. supply chain,” inviting a new era of supply chain collaboration. Pundits soon referred to collaborative supply chain design as the “ultimate core capability” and the “enabler of winning business models.” Based on your own experience with the day-to-day tussles that occur in the typical supply chain, you may wonder: “What on earth were they thinking?” The answer: Industry watchers had witnessed the stunning success of Honda and Toyota and viewed collaboration as inevitable.

For instance, as Honda prepared to bring the 1998 Accord to market, Honda’s internal analysis revealed two key points:

THE GOOD NEWS. Honda designers had developed an outstanding, customer-pleasing car.

THE BAD NEWS. As designed, the Accord would be too pricey. Honda needed to cut costs by 25%.

Because 80% to 85% of the typical Honda is sourced from suppliers, Honda had only one option: Ask suppliers for help. And that’s exactly what Honda did. Working with suppliers, the automaker lowered the cost of the ‘98 Accord by almost 30%. The launch was a success. Many of the technological advances developed for the 1998 Accord appeared in the next iteration of the Civic, a model that became a huge cash cow for Honda. The bottom line: Honda and its suppliers had shown that supply chains that work together win together.

This complete article is available to subscribers only.
Click on Log In Now at the top of this article for full access.
Or, Start your PLUS+ subscription for instant access.

Latest News

Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
The State of the DC Voice Market
Oracle Modern Supply Chain Experience Promises to Address Key Industry Issues
System Report: Automation from receiving to shipping
Preferred Freezer’s New Take on Automation
More News

Latest Resource

Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
You’ve got a handle on many of the potential supply chain "disrupters" that can paralyze your business. But the real risk is embedded in areas you may have overlooked.
All Resources
By ·
Download Article PDF

Twenty years ago, Boston Consulting Group’s Harold Sirkin warned that competition is no longer “company vs. company but supply chain vs. supply chain,” inviting a new era of supply chain collaboration. Pundits soon referred to collaborative supply chain design as the “ultimate core capability” and the “enabler of winning business models.” Based on your own experience with the day-to-day tussles that occur in the typical supply chain, you may wonder: “What on earth were they thinking?” The answer: Industry watchers had witnessed the stunning success of Honda and Toyota and viewed collaboration as inevitable.

For instance, as Honda prepared to bring the 1998 Accord to market, Honda’s internal analysis revealed two key points:

THE GOOD NEWS. Honda designers had developed an outstanding, customer-pleasing car.

THE BAD NEWS. As designed, the Accord would be too pricey. Honda needed to cut costs by 25%.

Because 80% to 85% of the typical Honda is sourced from suppliers, Honda had only one option: Ask suppliers for help. And that’s exactly what Honda did. Working with suppliers, the automaker lowered the cost of the ‘98 Accord by almost 30%. The launch was a success. Many of the technological advances developed for the 1998 Accord appeared in the next iteration of the Civic, a model that became a huge cash cow for Honda. The bottom line: Honda and its suppliers had shown that supply chains that work together win together.

SUBSCRIBERS: Click here to download PDF of the full article.

 


Subscribe to Supply Chain Management Review Magazine!

Subscribe today. Don't Miss Out!
Get in-depth coverage from industry experts with proven techniques for cutting supply chain costs and case studies in supply chain best practices.
Start Your Subscription Today!

Article Topics

Global Trade · Workforce · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
Third Party Risk: Too Close for Comfort
You’ve got a handle on many of the potential supply chain "disrupters" that can paralyze your business. But the real risk is embedded in areas you may have overlooked.
Download Today!
From the December 2017
This is a comprehensive guide to services, products and educational opportunities targeted specifically to supply chain professionals. As with years past, we’re also featuring several articles we trust will offer food for thought in your supply chain throughout the coming year.
Transportation Trends: The last mile, history repeating
Economic Outlook: A Complex and Uneven Scenario for Global Supply Chains
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!


Latest Webcast
The Perfect Formula for Determining the Right Amount of Inventory
This webcast explains how the science of theoretical minimums, a new approach to inventory optimization, provides a simple and elegant way to reduce cost and increase customer service levels by monetizing time delays across the extended supply chain.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
Oracle Modern Supply Chain Experience Promises to Address Key Industry Issues
In many cases, system and data from different vendors are integrated frequently, in different...
Atradius Issues New Report on Supply Chain Risk in North America
The U.S. shows strong economic performance, but the looming risk that leadership in Washington will...

2018: The year we make meaningful progress on digital transformation
Perhaps it would have been better to describe it as a digital evolution – more of an ongoing...
Industrial and Supply Chain Real Estate Expected to Soar in 2018
Strong economy and insatiable demand for online shopping behind industrial real estate resurgence