Login



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Not a PLUS+ Subscriber?

Become a PLUS+ Subscriber today and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access
  • 7 Magazine Issues per Year
  • Companion Digital Editions
  • Digital Edition Archives
  • Bonus Email Newsletters

Subscribe Today!

Premium access to exclusive online content, companion digital editions, magazine issues and email newsletters.

Subscribe Now.


Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2009.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $109/year*. Begin yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

* Prices higher for subscriptions outside the USA.

PLUS+ Customer Service Support


Customer service for all PLUS+ subscribers is available Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm Eastern time.

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)
Mail: PO Box 1496, Framingham MA 01701-1496, USA



You have been logged out of PLUS+


For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Need to access our premium PLUS+ Content?
Upgrade your subscription now.


Our records show that you are currently receiving a free subscription to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, or your subscription has expired. To access our premium content, you need to upgrade your subscription to our PLUS+ status.

To upgrade your subscription account, please contact customer service at:

Email: [email protected] Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)

Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2010.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $129/year*. Start yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

This content is available for PLUS+ subscribers.


Already a PLUS+ subscriber?


To begin or upgrade your subscription, Become a PLUS+ subscriber now.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Sorry, but your login to PLUS+ has failed.


Please recheck your login information and resubmit below.



For PLUS+ subscription assistance, contact customer service.

Is your supply chain ready for the next recession?

Ten years after the Great Recession, maybe it is time to ask: Are supply chains better prepared for the next recession now than in 2007?

By ·

Editor’s note: This is the first part of a two-part series on the recession and supply chains. Part 2 will be published in the January 2019 issue of SCMR.

The crash of 2008 is just a memory. The layoffs, bankruptcies, foreclosures and bailouts of 2008 through 2013 have faded away. Good times are rolling again. Employment is near a record high, businesses are expanding and the stock market is at record highs. What’s not to like?

Given all of the economic exuberance, we might sound a little like a voice crying in the wilderness, but someone needs to ask the question: How long will it last?

Consider this: A senior manager in his or her 60s has seen stock market crashes in 1962, 1974, 1981, 1987, 2002, and 2008. Before the crash of 2008, the average drop in the stock market for these crashes was 29% (range of 22% to 35%) and the average time to recover their value was 18 months (range 14 months to 23 months).

Stock markets signal the beginning of a recession but not the end. The employment rate begins falling and keeps falling for a year or more after the markets are already recovering nicely. The employment rate is a better signal for the end of a downturn and it usually takes twice as long as the stock market to recover.

The crash of 2008 and the recession that followed were much worse than normal for this era. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 53% from 14,093 to 6,600 and did not regain its former value for 5 1/3 years. The unemployment rate rose from 4.4% to a peak of 10% one year after the market crash.

It took employment another nine years to return to pre-crash levels. During the recession 7.9 million people in the United States lost their jobs, 6 million homes went into foreclosure and 4 million businesses closed. We have now enjoyed 10 years of recovery from this latest crash and recession.

The U.S. stock market has shot past its pre-crash level of 14,093 and soared to a range of 25,000 to 27,000. The unemployment rate has shrunk to below 4% as of the most recent jobs report. But the statistic hangs over us: 9 years between crashes is the recent average.

Maybe it’s time to see how prepared we are for the next crash. Did we learn anything? Are supply chains better prepared now than in 2007?

This complete article is available to subscribers only. Log in now for full access or start your PLUS+ subscription for instant access.

By ·

Editor’s note: This is the first part of a two-part series on the recession and supply chains. Part 2 will be published in the January 2019 issue of SCMR.

The crash of 2008 is just a memory. The layoffs, bankruptcies, foreclosures and bailouts of 2008 through 2013 have faded away. Good times are rolling again. Employment is near a record high, businesses are expanding and the stock market is at record highs. What’s not to like?

Given all of the economic exuberance, we might sound a little like a voice crying in the wilderness, but someone needs to ask the question: How long will it last?

Consider this: A senior manager in his or her 60s has seen stock market crashes in 1962, 1974, 1981, 1987, 2002, and 2008. Before the crash of 2008, the average drop in the stock market for these crashes was 29% (range of 22% to 35%) and the average time to recover their value was 18 months (range 14 months to 23 months).

Stock markets signal the beginning of a recession but not the end. The employment rate begins falling and keeps falling for a year or more after the markets are already recovering nicely. The employment rate is a better signal for the end of a downturn and it usually takes twice as long as the stock market to recover.

The crash of 2008 and the recession that followed were much worse than normal for this era. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 53% from 14,093 to 6,600 and did not regain its former value for 5 1/3 years. The unemployment rate rose from 4.4% to a peak of 10% one year after the market crash.

It took employment another nine years to return to pre-crash levels. During the recession 7.9 million people in the United States lost their jobs, 6 million homes went into foreclosure and 4 million businesses closed. We have now enjoyed 10 years of recovery from this latest crash and recession.

The U.S. stock market has shot past its pre-crash level of 14,093 and soared to a range of 25,000 to 27,000. The unemployment rate has shrunk to below 4% as of the most recent jobs report. But the statistic hangs over us: 9 years between crashes is the recent average.

Maybe it’s time to see how prepared we are for the next crash. Did we learn anything? Are supply chains better prepared now than in 2007?

 


Subscribe to Supply Chain Management Review Magazine!

Subscribe today. Don't Miss Out!
Get in-depth coverage from industry experts with proven techniques for cutting supply chain costs and case studies in supply chain best practices.
Start Your Subscription Today!

Latest Whitepaper
The Digital Supply Network: The Era of Supply Chain Visibility and Tracking
Supply chain innovation will determine which companies succeed as traditional practices are disrupted.
Download Today!
From the December 2018
This is a comprehensive guide to services, products and educational opportunities targeted specifically to supply chain professionals.
The Common Pitfalls of Demand Planning
Storm Clouds on the Horizon for Supply Chain Operations?
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!


Latest Webcast
Leveraging the Internet of Things (IoT) in Manufacturing
Is Digital Transformation a risk or an opportunity? This webinar will detail Manufacturing industry challenges and how using IoT can address these challenges through optimizing logistics, improving processes and gaining meaningful insights.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
Global Kuehne + Nagel Indicators Signal Global Supply Chain Resilience
So far this year, international merchandise trade has risen by 10.6%. Emerging markets and North...
A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council Predictions Released
GBPC’s 10 major predictions, fleshed out in the study, are based on continuous scanning of the...

New Research Indicates Greener Supply Chains Mean More Profit
Transparency is key when selecting new suppliers as 85% of businesses want to achieve a...
New Survey Measures Potential Impact of Tariffs on U.S. Supply Chains
The proportion of total output produced abroad is meanwhile expected to rise very marginally.