PLUS+ Login


To log into your PLUS+ Account, complete and submit the information below.

Not a PLUS+ subscriber already? Become one now.


For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Premium access to exclusive online content,
companion digital editions, magazine issues and
email newsletters. Subscribe Now.



Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2009.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $109/year*. Begin yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

* Prices higher for subscriptions outside the USA.

You have been logged out of PLUS+

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service

Need to access our premium PLUS+ Content?
Upgrade your subscription now.

Our records show that you are currently receiving a free subscription to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, or your subscription has expired. To access our premium content, you need to upgrade your subscription to our PLUS+ status.

To upgrade your subscription account, please contact customer service at:

Email: [email protected] Phone: 1-800-598-6067 (1-508-663-1500 x294 outside USA)

Become a PLUS+ subscriber and you'll get access to all Supply Chain Management Review premium content including:

  • Full Web Access. All feature articles, bonus reports and industry research through scmr.com.

  • 7 Magazine Issues per year of Supply Chain Management Review magazine.

  • Companion Digital Editions. Searchable replicas of each magazine issue. Read them in any web browser. Delivered by email faster than printed issues.

  • Digital Editions Archives. Every article, every chart and every table as it appeared in the magazine for all archive issues back to 2010.

  • Bonus email newsletters. Add convenient weekly and monthly email newsletters to your subscription to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry.

PLUS+ subscriptions start as low as $129/year*. Start yours now.
That's less than $0.36 per day for access to information that you can use year-round to better manage your entire global supply chain.

This content is available for PLUS+ subscribers.


Already a PLUS+ subscriber?
To begin or upgrade your subscription, Become a PLUS+ subscriber now.

For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Sorry, but your login to PLUS+ has failed.


Please recheck your login information and resubmit below.



For assistance with your PLUS+ subscription, contact customer service.

Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Bringin’ it all back home

As conditions change in some emerging markets, companies that once outsourced some of their manufacturing and distribution processes are thinking about bringing them back in-house. We look at the five key considerations a company should explore before pulling the trigger on insourcing their outsourced processes.
By Rand Stille and Sriram Narayanan
Rand Stille is vice president, Universal Logistics Holdings. He can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). For more information, visit goutsi.com. Sriram Narayanan is an associate professor in the department of supply chain management at the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. He can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). For more information, visit broad.msu.edu.
July 5, 2016

Outsourcing and globalization: For the better part of this century, these strategic initiatives have gone hand-in-glove at many organizations. Whether in pursuit of lower costs, simplifying operations or just trying to keep pace with the global expansion of their customers, companies have sought to outsource nonessential operations with an emphasis on more global supply chains. Many of these supply chains were established at a feverish pace as the global outsourcing trend was met with the open arms of developing countries eager to participate. Today, however, some of these supply chains have been operational for years. The low-hanging fruit has been picked and the dust has long settled from the intrepid efforts of the global outsourcing “gold rush.” Additionally the pace of economic growth of emerging economies has slowed, which may present new risks and financial considerations.

All of that is leading some companies to reassess their operations and supply chains with more global experience and a greater sense of scrutiny. While many of the supply chains established during the globalization gold rush still provide a sustainable strategic advantage, several other outsourcing decisions may no longer represent the best value option. Accordingly, organizations need to constantly reassess their strategic options and ask where it makes sense to bring some activities back in-house. This does not necessarily mean re-shoring: While some activities may be brought back to a company’s home turf, insourcing may also involve using in-house personnel to execute tasks in an existing foreign market that are currently outsourced. In this regard, insourcing is the new challenge in today’s supply chains.

Insourcing efforts are often justified on several grounds; these include reducing costs, improving the value delivered to customers and building organizational capabilities. However, insourcing activities are not risk free. Quite to the contrary, they involve critical challenges in transitioning work and carry a considerable risk of failure.

This complete article is available to subscribers only.
Click on Log In Now at the top of this article for full access.
Or, Start your PLUS+ subscription for instant access.

 

Download Article PDF

Outsourcing and globalization: For the better part of this century, these strategic initiatives have gone hand-in-glove at many organizations. Whether in pursuit of lower costs, simplifying operations or just trying to keep pace with the global expansion of their customers, companies have sought to outsource nonessential operations with an emphasis on more global supply chains. Many of these supply chains were established at a feverish pace as the global outsourcing trend was met with the open arms of developing countries eager to participate. Today, however, some of these supply chains have been operational for years. The low-hanging fruit has been picked and the dust has long settled from the intrepid efforts of the global outsourcing “gold rush.” Additionally the pace of economic growth of emerging economies has slowed, which may present new risks and financial considerations.

All of that is leading some companies to reassess their operations and supply chains with more global experience and a greater sense of scrutiny. While many of the supply chains established during the globalization gold rush still provide a sustainable strategic advantage, several other outsourcing decisions may no longer represent the best value option. Accordingly, organizations need to constantly reassess their strategic options and ask where it makes sense to bring some activities back in-house. This does not necessarily mean re-shoring: While some activities may be brought back to a company’s home turf, insourcing may also involve using in-house personnel to execute tasks in an existing foreign market that are currently outsourced. In this regard, insourcing is the new challenge in today’s supply chains.

Insourcing efforts are often justified on several grounds; these include reducing costs, improving the value delivered to customers and building organizational capabilities. However, insourcing activities are not risk free. Quite to the contrary, they involve critical challenges in transitioning work and carry a considerable risk of failure.

SUBSCRIBERS: Click here to download PDF of the full article.

Subscribe to Supply Chain Management Review magazine

Subscribe today. Don't miss out!
Get in-depth coverage from industry experts with proven techniques for
cutting supply chain costs and case studies in supply chain best practices.
Start Your Subscription Today!

Recent Entries

While primary industrial markets often have higher rents and lower vacancies for warehouse and distribution center space, research published today by industrial real estate firm CBRE makes the case for increasing future growth for secondary industrial markets.

Planning took center stage at the Best of the Best conference. But attendees acknowledged recognition of its benefits is far from certain.

Navis, a part of Cargotec Corporation, told supply chain managers charged with keeping abreast of the latest changes in automation. But in a subsequent report released this week, analysts say that some sectors of the industry continue to resist.

The maritime industry and broader ocean supply chain are suffering from major and costly inefficiencies due to ineffective data sharing and poor cross-industry collaboration, according to a new report and industry survey released today by the Business Performance Innovation (BPI) Network in coordination with Navis and XVELA, both part of Cargotec

Robots need to be built, programmed, customized, maintained, serviced and continuously updated. This requires logistics planners, hardware designers, engineers, computer programmers, materials management specialists, and a multitude of other technicians.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2017 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA