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Back to Basics: Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions

What Are The “Basics” For Supply Chain Managers Today?

<p>This “Back to Basics” series from the faculty at the University of Tennessee will help supply chain professionals master the “basic” fundamentals - but within the context of the broader supply chain process.</p>

This “Back to Basics” series from the faculty at the University of Tennessee will help supply chain professionals master the “basic” fundamentals - but within the context of the broader supply chain process.

By ·

Supply Chain Management Review has developed a series called “Back to Basics.”  It’s a look into how excellence in the core logistics and supply chain activities leads to overall business success. The articles in this seven-part series (listed below) are written by educators from the University of Tennessee.


Part 1 - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions
imageWhat are the “basics” for supply chain managers today? Ten years ago, the supply chain leader in most companies held a title such as vice president of logistics. It was a largely functional role that relied on technical proficiency in discrete areas: knowledge of shipping routes, familiarity with warehousing equipment and DC locations, and a solid grasp of freight rates and fuel costs. more….


Part 2 - Transportation Decision-Making in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 2 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” This article addresses the key decision levels that need to be addressed for transportation to make its greatest impact in the integrated supply chain. These levels address long-term decisions, lane operations, choice of mode or carrier, and dock level operations. more….


Part 3 - Warehousing Efficiency and Effectiveness in the Supply Chain Process
imagePart 3 on our series “Back to Basics.” Warehousing Efficiency and Effectiveness in the Supply Chain Process - Where Are We Now? What’s Next? This article will address “back to the basics” that are fundamental for warehouses to achieve both efficiency and effectiveness in supply chains, and provide some perspective on current challenges and the future. more….


Part 4 - A Primer on Sourcing and Procurement in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 4 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” The task of sourcing and procurement professionals is to find an effective means to balance the demands of both internal and external customers with economic considerations while taking into account the potential for supply disruption and technological change. more….


Part 5 - Effective Returns Management in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 5 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” Returns management should no longer be the ugly step-child of the supply chain. Rather, effective returns management can improve a firm’s profitability, enhance customer relationships, and be an essential part of an integrated supply chain management strategy. more….


Part 6 - The Service Side of Supply Chain Management
imagePart 6 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” Service traditionally has been viewed as part of the market offering. However, by thinking of supply chain management services in this way, we are focusing on service as a noun, we need to think of service as a verb. This concept is known as service dominant logic. more….


Part 7 - The Many Benefits of Supply Chain Collaboration
imagePart 7 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” This article explains how Supply Chain Collaboration benefits extend beyond improved efficiency and effectiveness to include helping all the supply chain members meet customer demands, grow markets, and increase competitive market share. more….

The 7-part series is available in PDF format to subscribers only.
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<p>This “Back to Basics” series from the faculty at the University of Tennessee will help supply chain professionals master the “basic” fundamentals - but within the context of the broader supply chain process.</p>

This “Back to Basics” series from the faculty at the University of Tennessee will help supply chain professionals master the “basic” fundamentals - but within the context of the broader supply chain process.

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By ·
Download Series PDF

Supply Chain Management Review has developed a series called “Back to Basics.”  It’s a look into how excellence in the core logistics and supply chain activities leads to overall business success. The articles in this seven-part series (listed below) are written by educators from the University of Tennessee.


Part 1 - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions
imageWhat are the “basics” for supply chain managers today? Ten years ago, the supply chain leader in most companies held a title such as vice president of logistics. It was a largely functional role that relied on technical proficiency in discrete areas: knowledge of shipping routes, familiarity with warehousing equipment and DC locations, and a solid grasp of freight rates and fuel costs. more….


Part 2 - Transportation Decision-Making in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 2 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” This article addresses the key decision levels that need to be addressed for transportation to make its greatest impact in the integrated supply chain. These levels address long-term decisions, lane operations, choice of mode or carrier, and dock level operations. more….


Part 3 - Warehousing Efficiency and Effectiveness in the Supply Chain Process
imagePart 3 on our series “Back to Basics.” Warehousing Efficiency and Effectiveness in the Supply Chain Process - Where Are We Now? What’s Next? This article will address “back to the basics” that are fundamental for warehouses to achieve both efficiency and effectiveness in supply chains, and provide some perspective on current challenges and the future. more….


Part 4 - A Primer on Sourcing and Procurement in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 4 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” The task of sourcing and procurement professionals is to find an effective means to balance the demands of both internal and external customers with economic considerations while taking into account the potential for supply disruption and technological change. more….


Part 5 - Effective Returns Management in an Integrated Supply Chain
imagePart 5 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” Returns management should no longer be the ugly step-child of the supply chain. Rather, effective returns management can improve a firm’s profitability, enhance customer relationships, and be an essential part of an integrated supply chain management strategy. more….


Part 6 - The Service Side of Supply Chain Management
imagePart 6 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” Service traditionally has been viewed as part of the market offering. However, by thinking of supply chain management services in this way, we are focusing on service as a noun, we need to think of service as a verb. This concept is known as service dominant logic. more….


Part 7 - The Many Benefits of Supply Chain Collaboration
imagePart 7 in our series on “Back to Basics - Managing The Basic Supply Chain Functions.” This article explains how Supply Chain Collaboration benefits extend beyond improved efficiency and effectiveness to include helping all the supply chain members meet customer demands, grow markets, and increase competitive market share. more….

SUBSCRIBERS: Click here to download PDF of the full 7 part series.

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The Digital Supply Network: The Era of Supply Chain Visibility and Tracking
Supply chain innovation will determine which companies succeed as traditional practices are disrupted.
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From the December 2018
This is a comprehensive guide to services, products and educational opportunities targeted specifically to supply chain professionals.
The Common Pitfalls of Demand Planning
Storm Clouds on the Horizon for Supply Chain Operations?
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